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Highly Compressed
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I blew some Christmas money. Bought a set of Ford Motor Sport's lower control arms. These control arms are interesting because the end that bolts to the rear subframe is a ball and socket type connector, no polyurethane bushings. The rears are polyurethane bushed with zerk fittings. These are a little more expensive than your average lower control arms. Anyway, I got the old ones out and they don't amount to much more than stamped pieces of junk. The FMS' are heavy....I had my head up under the passenger side lca when it dislodged and popped me in the eye,:eek: hurt like a mo-fo. So I spend a couple of hours lining up the holes in the lca with the holes in each of the forward control arm eyelets. It definitely was harder than I thought as it took a lot of coersion with a rubber mallet. You miss it by a couple of milimeters...its a no go. So I got both sides hooked up to the rear subframe and then quit. I had to order the rubber isolators that sit on the lca's spring perch, mine were pretty rotten. Dealer should have them in tomorrow. I'm sure I'm done with the hardest part unless its gonna be a bitch to line up the eyelets with the holes in the perch under the axle tube....probably will be...Murphy's law.... So, I hope I notice a difference with these thangs or I'm gonna be pissed at all the effort I spent.:mad: To be continued.........
 

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Im somebody's daddy!
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12,567 Posts
Put the springs in AFTER you get the control arms in. Make sure the quad shocks are disconnected at one end, and disconnect the shock at the rear end. Jack up one side of the rear end up all the way at the control arm mounting point and put the spring in on the other side. Then put the jack at the control arm mounting point you just put the spring in and jack it up all the way and put the other spring in on the other side. Makes it alot easier.
 
G

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You can leave the quads off with these LCA's. They're not going to be doing anything anyway. You can also replace the uppers with FRPP arms to reduce axle twist a little more, but they don't bind like poly bushing arms do. They're quiet and inexpensive too. I've installed literally dozens of these FRPP (Global West) lowers and they do work very well. The only complaint is the noises transmitted into the body from the Del-a-Lum bushings and spherical bearings. The spherical bearings also have a tendency to start popping after a little while and the only fix is replacing them. Luckily Global's been good about replacing them under warranty, but it's still a pain having to take them on and off to swap them. Also, you can use poly spring isolators instead of the stock rubber pieces to reduce noise slightly. These fit the new arms better too and won't rip on top like the stock pieces will.

~Ron

S.E. Racing
 

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Highly Compressed
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
And now....the rest of the story.... The dealer had the rubber isolators in this morning. Picked em' up and continued the install. If I had known I could have bought poly isolators I would have bought em, the new ones already tore slightly during the install. I was so busy I didn't get to read the tips posted here until after I had performed the install. Actually, the rears of the lower control arms went in pretty easy. I inserted the springs and jacked each control arm into place. With the sway bar disconnected, I could push each side of the axle to line up the holes....no prob. At the same time, I took off my off road h-pipe and reinstalled my catalytic system...inspection's in January and I have to pass. Talk about PITA:mad: But that's another post. So I take the car out for a stroll and it feels like the suspension is a little stiffer (you know how your car feels faster after you washed it:D). The true test will be at Kennedale when it reopens.
 

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Ron said:
You can leave the quads off with these LCA's. They're not going to be doing anything anyway. You can also replace the uppers with FRPP arms to reduce axle twist a little more, but they don't bind like poly bushing arms do. They're quiet and inexpensive too. I've installed literally dozens of these FRPP (Global West) lowers and they do work very well. The only complaint is the noises transmitted into the body from the Del-a-Lum bushings and spherical bearings. The spherical bearings also have a tendency to start popping after a little while and the only fix is replacing them. Luckily Global's been good about replacing them under warranty, but it's still a pain having to take them on and off to swap them. Also, you can use poly spring isolators instead of the stock rubber pieces to reduce noise slightly. These fit the new arms better too and won't rip on top like the stock pieces will.

~Ron

S.E. Racing
Poly bushings only bind when they are installed by amatuers. Any poly bushing arm should move up and down freely without any binding or it is installed improperly. I've changed out entire suspensions with polyuerathane bushings without any squeaking.
 
G

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Keep in mind, LCA's don't just move up and down. They also have to twist at one or both ends so the axle can articulate. Poly bushings are fine if all you do is go in straight lines, but they do bind with any lateral force applied or when one side of the axle wants to move higher or lower than the other. And since uppers are in a constant state of bind anyway, you need to have at least one end in rubber or something pliable to keep it from wanting to lock up. Not saying it won't move, but the action isn't as fluid as with other materials. Solid bushings like spherical bearings work almost 100% bind free, but they have their drawbacks with noise and harshness at times. Rubber bushings are forgiving for noises and what-not, but they deflect a lot more than poly or solid bushings and don't do a very good job of keeping things in place. Global's Del-a-Lum bushings are unique in the way they allow very little deflection, yet they stay very free with lateral forces. They just wouldn't work on both ends of LCA's because they couldn't articulate. Some companies use multy piece poly, or poly and rubber to try and get the best of both worlds, but they have a tendency to not last very long and don't work that great anyway. All attempts with these different materials are to try and keep things moving as freely as possible, but at the same time keep components moving in their designated arcs. If solid poly bushings were the answer, everyone would use them and there wouldn't be room for improvement. Companies like Griggs, Global West, Maximum, etc. would all go out of business because cheaper arms from BBK, Factory Five, and Mac would be the best you could get. But compare a Grigg's car or a Maximum car to poly bushing car around a track (or the street for that matter) and you WILL see the difference.

~Ron

S.E. Racing
 
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