Reloaders what brand tools are you using? - DFWstangs Forums
 
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-07-2010, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
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Reloaders what brand tools are you using?

My step dad bought me a few reloading books, and told me to come talk to him about all the tools, after I am done reading all of them. What he doesn't know that its only about 100 pages of reading and the rest of the 400 pages is just load, and bullet data.

The Horanady book I am reading sells their products well, but I didn't whats the best to use.

Also I will be loading ammo for my AR-15 with a 16" barrel, and I wanted to know any tips on what you use load, and bullet weight wise.

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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-07-2010, 02:49 PM
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RCBS and Dillon are probably the best (Dillon probably #1).

I'd stay away from any Lee presses. They work, but they aren't built to last.

You need to figure out what you are going to be shooting and work from there.

Are you going to be hunting, plinking, or target style shooting. You'd have to research the most accurate projectile for your style of shooting and then use the load tables to find something that fits your needs. Or, register at AR15.com and browse there.

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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-07-2010, 03:10 PM
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^^^^
what he said. Most of my rifle reloading stuff is RCBS with a couple Hornady, Redding and Lee dies. Shotgun loaders are MEC. I have a couple Lee turret presses I use for pistol loads that have done ok. I don't care for Lee single stage presses, just seem weaker than the others.....

case trimmer and powder scale are RCBS also.

If you are loading for best accuracy for target shooting I would get the more expensive die set (I think it is called benchrest or match), it guides the bullet straighter into the case; if you are hunting or plinking or not trying to get super accurate the regular die sets are fine.

There are usually a couple booths at Market Hall gun show, this weekend, that sell reloading equipment and supplies.....
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-07-2010, 06:22 PM
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If you are loading .223 for an AR then you are definitely going to want a progressive reloader. Dillon is the best IMO. Hopefully you have some other rifles/pistols that you want to reload for because by the time you are done buying equipment and supplies, you could have added another AR to your collection.
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-07-2010, 09:16 PM
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I only reload handgun stuff right now, But I use the dillon 650. it is a nice machine to say the least

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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 10:30 AM
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Almost everything I have is RCBS wwith the exception of a few dies.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 03trubluGT View Post
RCBS and Dillon are probably the best (Dillon probably #1).

I'd stay away from any Lee presses. They work, but they aren't built to last.

You need to figure out what you are going to be shooting and work from there.

Are you going to be hunting, plinking, or target style shooting. You'd have to research the most accurate projectile for your style of shooting and then use the load tables to find something that fits your needs. Or, register at AR15.com and browse there.
I'll debate the Lee Press Statements. I know a LOT of people that have been using the Lee Single Stage Press for over 10+ Years.

My suggestion is that you go out and buy a Hornady Reloading Manual. They are about 30 bucks and will give you a lot of information that you will need to reload.

MOST people use Hornady Bullets anyway, so having their reload manual isn't a bad thing.

(I Know that you have a hornady book now, but is it the most current one?)

Reloading for the .223 will cost you some money. Basically for the cost of the bullets, powder, the primers, the equipment, you'll never really get your money out of it.

Example, assuming that you have your equipment already:

100 Hornady Bullets (.224 V-Max 55 Grain) (At Bass Pro for example) Is $25 bucks.
1 pound of Hodgdons BL-C(2) Powder (Known as Ball-C which works well with .223) is Roughly $25.00
100 Small Rifle Primers 7-1/2 Remingtons $3.00

ASSUMING YOU have 100 Empty cases (Free)

$53.00 + tax .. Lets keep it simple and say $60.00

You can go out and buy 2 boxes of 50 count Hornady 55 Grain Softpoints or FMJ's for $25-27 dollars each. (Brass cases, not the wolf stuff).

For 2 boxes of factory ammo, you have the same cost as if you reloaded. Thats tough to beat.

----------------

NOTE: I still reload .223 because I like reloading, however, if you step up to other calibers, such as .308 as a example, you'll be able to make rounds cheaper than you can buy factory loads for. (Now if you compare Russian ammo in the cost per round, you'll might as well buy russian ammo, because you can't reload it cheaper than you can buy that steel case stuff.)

IN MY OPINION : If you are just going to reload .223, you might as well buy the factory hornady 50 count boxes. If you want to reload for a new hobby, then go for it. If you have multiple calibers, go for it.

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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 12:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big_tiger View Post
My step dad bought me a few reloading books, and told me to come talk to him about all the tools, after I am done reading all of them. What he doesn't know that its only about 100 pages of reading and the rest of the 400 pages is just load, and bullet data.

The Horanady book I am reading sells their products well, but I didn't whats the best to use.

Also I will be loading ammo for my AR-15 with a 16" barrel, and I wanted to know any tips on what you use load, and bullet weight wise.
For bullet weights, it depends on the twist of your AR-15, I assume you have a 1:9 Twist.

You'll want to use 55 grain bullets, however you can shoot up to 69 grain bullets. On 70+ Grain bullets you should have a 1:7 Twist barrel (To allow your gun to stabilize the round.)

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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 01:32 PM
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I use a Lee single stage press and Lee dies to reload 45 ACP. If I were going to do rifle ammo, I think I'd get a progressive setup.
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by own3d View Post
I use a Lee single stage press and Lee dies to reload 45 ACP. If I were going to do rifle ammo, I think I'd get a progressive setup.
I'd rather use a progressive on pistol ammo, and use a single stage on rifle ammo.

I prefer to measure all my rifle charges on a digital scale. Ive seen the aftermath of a rifle exploding because of a incorrect charge. On a handgun, its not as bad. But on a rifle, its like a freaking bomb going off.

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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 02:08 PM
dee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dacotua View Post
I'll debate the Lee Press Statements. I know a LOT of people that have been using the Lee Single Stage Press for over 10+ Years.

My suggestion is that you go out and buy a Hornady Reloading Manual. They are about 30 bucks and will give you a lot of information that you will need to reload.

MOST people use Hornady Bullets anyway, so having their reload manual isn't a bad thing.

(I Know that you have a hornady book now, but is it the most current one?)

Reloading for the .223 will cost you some money. Basically for the cost of the bullets, powder, the primers, the equipment, you'll never really get your money out of it.

Example, assuming that you have your equipment already:

100 Hornady Bullets (.224 V-Max 55 Grain) (At Bass Pro for example) Is $25 bucks.
1 pound of Hodgdons BL-C(2) Powder (Known as Ball-C which works well with .223) is Roughly $25.00
100 Small Rifle Primers 7-1/2 Remingtons $3.00

ASSUMING YOU have 100 Empty cases (Free)

$53.00 + tax .. Lets keep it simple and say $60.00

You can go out and buy 2 boxes of 50 count Hornady 55 Grain Softpoints or FMJ's for $25-27 dollars each. (Brass cases, not the wolf stuff).

For 2 boxes of factory ammo, you have the same cost as if you reloaded. Thats tough to beat.

----------------

NOTE: I still reload .223 because I like reloading, however, if you step up to other calibers, such as .308 as a example, you'll be able to make rounds cheaper than you can buy factory loads for. (Now if you compare Russian ammo in the cost per round, you'll might as well buy russian ammo, because you can't reload it cheaper than you can buy that steel case stuff.)

IN MY OPINION : If you are just going to reload .223, you might as well buy the factory hornady 50 count boxes. If you want to reload for a new hobby, then go for it. If you have multiple calibers, go for it.
That is why I never reloaded for my AR. The only way it would be worthwhile to reload for it is if you have a bolt gun or an AR that needs heavier bullet weights cause most of the cheap stuff is 55gr.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by dee View Post
That is why I never reloaded for my AR. The only way it would be worthwhile to reload for it is if you have a bolt gun or an AR that needs heavier bullet weights cause most of the cheap stuff is 55gr.
Exactly.
Most folks I know that hand load don't do it for the savings.
We pulled apart some .220 swift Hornady factory loads and weighed the powder and was amazed at the inaccuracy. I would hate to break open some cheaper Remingtons.

I dont reload, my brother in law does it all. He will spend literally hundreds of hours perfecting a round for each gun.
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-08-2010, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Chopped54 View Post
Exactly.
Most folks I know that hand load don't do it for the savings.
We pulled apart some .220 swift Hornady factory loads and weighed the powder and was amazed at the inaccuracy. I would hate to break open some cheaper Remingtons.

I dont reload, my brother in law does it all. He will spend literally hundreds of hours perfecting a round for each gun.
Like I said before, reloading for .223 / .30-06 / 7.62x39 isn't worth it, unless you enjoy doing it. However other calibers it is .308 / 300 Win Mag / 7mm Mags / any of the WSM calibers, etc.. are worth reloading.

Its IFFY to reload for 9mm also... But .45acp can show savings.

One big advantage I like about reloading, is that I always have ammo. Even when people were hording all the hunting ammo off the shelves, I could load my own hunting loads.

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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-18-2010, 10:39 AM
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If you go progressive, you need ball powder like W748 for .223. Varget and Reloder 15 are popular but doesn't measure well in most powder droppers. AA2230 is excellent ball powder for .223. I shoot 36gr to 75gr with the AA2230.

I started with Lee progressive Pro 1000 making 41 mag. I went to .45 ACP, and .223 and then got a Lee single stage to do several different rifle cartridges including 270 Win, 7mm Mag, 308 Win, 8x57, and 375 H&H. I sold the Pro 1000 and kept the single stage. I just don't shoot enough to make the progressive worth it and I shoot monthly. I can make 50 45 ACP in about an hour on the single stage. W231 is good powder for 45 ACP and 380 ACP, I like Power pistol for 9mm, 40 S&W and 45 ACP +P. H110 for magnums like 357,41, or 44.

Lee stuff is affordable and works, but requires lots of tuning/maintenance for the progressive.

Dillon is top notch and $$$, but way overkill unless you want to make a lot of ammo. They are a pain to do caliber changes compared to the Lee.

RCBS, Redding, Hornady, Lyman, Forster all make quality stuff. Most guys will have a variety of brands on their reloading bench. I have Lee, Redding and RCBS dies, Lyman tumbler, RCBS Charge Master, etc. Match shooters are well known to use the cheap Lee hand prime and Lee trimmers. But if you want the big bucks stuff, see Sinclair.

Midway USA, MidSouth Shoooters, and Grafs have a lot of stuff in stock.

Buy powder and primers locally. See Cabela's in Fort Worth or Southwest Ammo Supply in Mesquite. Buying 1lb of powder will go quickly in a 270 Win, 7mm Mag or larger caliber. Buy 5-8lb canisters if you can. 1000 primers will go quick in semi-auto. Some places sell 5,000 boxes or more.

Buy 100 bullets and see how they shoot before buying 1000. Match, bulk and varmint bullets are available in 250, 500, 1000 or more boxes. Match and Varmint bullets are very accurate.

Save your brass and find the ranges that allow brass pickup.

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