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post #1 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
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Kids Working Out With Weights?

What are someone of you guys thoughts about Kids working out with weights? My 9 year old works out lightly with free weights and wants to start doing it a little more frequently to "tone and bulk up" for football season.

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post #2 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 12:15 PM
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Get him into sports and other active hobbies, 9 is way to young to be lifting. His skeleton is still growing, and it will and can stunt his growth.

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post #3 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 12:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by The Raven
Get him into sports and other active hobbies, 9 is way to young to be lifting. His skeleton is still growing, and it will and can stunt his growth.

He plays all sports and plays Soccer year round. Most of the time he is either playing 2 to 3 sports during a season. He is not your typical stay inside and play video games, i don't want to go outside, overweight kid like most. He is very active. I have consulted his pediatrician about him even lifting weights in the past and he said it was fine as long as he did not over do it. Meaning, for him not to try and max out weights, but light weights and low reps. Like I said, now he wants to be more toned and defined. Along with I think he wants to bulk up a little bit. Just trying to get some input and opinions about this in general.

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post #4 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by 93WHITELXCOUPE
he wants to be more toned and defined. Along with I think he wants to bulk up a little bit.

WTF? He's 9. That puts him in, what, 3rd grade?


Tell him that good grades, going to bed on time and eating all his vegetables is the only way to get big.
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post #5 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 01:25 PM
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No fucking way would I let my kid lift weights that young.

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post #6 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 01:46 PM
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My 7 year old tries to do chinups and sometimes he picks up the 2.5lb weights and mimics my movements while I am lifting. Then he flexes his muscle so I can tell him how it is looking bigger. I think its cute.

As for kids actually working out though, I feel like more exercise is good for kids these days since they ride in cars everywhere and sit around playing video games whereas back a few generations ago they would have been walking everywhere they wanted to go (around the neightborhood and beyond) and be playing outside all the time doing physical stuff, and would have been required to help out in the fields (more physical stuff), etc... kids don't get enough exercise anymore, plus I'm not all pumped about what I keep hearing about the results of them playing those video games all the time. Lifting weights may be a little strange, but I feel that doing a few situps and pushups and chinups and running and climbing and all that would be a definite benefit to their health.

I had heard some time ago that it was a bad thing to lift weights much at all before a certain age, but I can't remember that age, and it seems like I heard later that the reasons stated thatit was bad were later proven to be wrong.

This would be something that could use a little research I guess.
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post #7 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 01:50 PM
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Isometrics, sit-ups, push-ups, running, swimming is basically what my 11 year old does. He's got on the Bowflex to go through the motion, but no serious resistance. I told him he won't be doing anything with weights until 16 at the earliest.
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post #8 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 01:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stroked71Bowtie
WTF? He's 9. That puts him in, what, 3rd grade?

Tell him that good grades, going to bed on time and eating all his vegetables is the only way to get big.

Yeah, he's going into the 4th grade. And as far as the grades go, he's a straight "A" student in the GT program. He's not your typical 9 year old though, he is about the size of most 5th or 6th graders. Probably about as smart too!

As far as eating habits go, he does not like candy or junk food really. He would rather eat fruit all day if you let him. He eats 4 to 5 times a day. I swear the boy has the fastest metabolism I have ever seen. (Like when you eat Chinese food, you are hungry again in an hour.) He can actually out eat me.

Back to weight training. It's not like he is doing a full on weight training program. Just trying to get some feedback on what people think.

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post #9 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:01 PM
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Most trainers I've spoken to will tell you that weights are not for kids. Raven is right again on this one. No weights for young kids.

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post #10 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny
Isometrics, sit-ups, push-ups, running, swimming is basically what my 11 year old does. He's got on the Bowflex to go through the motion, but no serious resistance. I told him he won't be doing anything with weights until 16 at the earliest.
I started at around 15 years old and saw very good gains. I think I was able to one rep max about 60 lbs when I started and I was up to 100 in a very short time. I had never been much into sports at all and I was a toothpick with a through-the-roof metabolism. Not knowing about nutrition caused me to have really slow success soon after. I didn't eat any more than I had been. it was the end of my Softmre year and I was finally able to one rep max 200!
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post #11 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPS
Most trainers I've spoken to will tell you that weights are not for kids. Raven is right again on this one. No weights for young kids.

JPS
But, what is the age where it becomes ok?
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post #12 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:17 PM
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Here is something from CNN.COM

Strength training: OK for kids when done correctly
From MayoClinic.com
Special to CNN.com


The young athlete in your family is disciplined and devoted, squeezing in practice whenever he or she can. Now your child wants to start strength training. You've heard coaches and other parents talk about strength training, but you wonder — is strength training really good for a child?

The answer is yes. Strength training exercises that are supervised, safe and age-appropriate offer many bonuses to young athletes.

The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the National Strength and Conditioning Association all support strength training for kids — if it's done properly. Today's children are increasingly overweight and out of shape. Strength training can help put them on the lifetime path to better health and fitness.


Strength training, not weightlifting

Strength training for kids — not to be confused with weightlifting, bodybuilding or powerlifting — is a carefully designed program of exercises to increase muscle strength and endurance. Weightlifting, bodybuilding and powerlifting are largely driven by competition, with participants vying to lift heavier weights or build bigger muscles than other athletes. This can put too much strain on young muscles, tendons and growth plates, especially when proper technique is sacrificed in favor of lifting larger amounts of weight.

Strength training for kids, however, isn't about lifting the heaviest weight possible. Instead, the focus is on lighter weights and controlled movements, with a special emphasis on proper technique and safety.

Your child can build muscle strength using:

Free weights
Weight machines
Resistance bands
His or her own body weight

Benefits for young athletes

Strength training for kids has gotten a bad reputation over the years. Lifting weights, for example, was once thought to damage young growth plates — areas of cartilage that have not yet turned to bone. Experts now realize that with good technique and the right amount of resistance, young athletes can avoid growth plate injuries. Strengthening exercises, with proper training and supervision, provide many benefits to a young athlete.

Supervised strength training that emphasizes proper technique:

Increases your child's muscle strength and endurance
Protects your child's muscles and joints from injury
Helps improve performance in a particular sport
Your child may gain other health benefits from strength training, too. These include:

Better heart and lung function
A healthy body composition
Stronger bones
Lower blood cholesterol levels
A good fitness habit that lasts a lifetime
Some studies suggest that improved self-esteem and a decreased chance of depression also are upshots of strength training. Your child may get a feel-good boost after improving his or her performance.


Who benefits most?

Strength training benefits older preteens more than younger kids. At the age of 5 to 6, kids should be focusing on body awareness and body control, balance, running, jumping and throwing.

Strength training also helps those kids who have a focused interest in a particular sport. For example, a figure skater or dancer who has a goal of jumping higher can improve with strength training. Football players, soccer players — just about all young athletes — can enhance their performance with a strength training program.

Because technique and proper form are so important, don't let your child begin strength training until he or she is mature enough to accept directions. A good rule of thumb is if your child is old enough to participate in organized sports, such as hockey, soccer or gymnastics, he or she is ready for some form of strength training.


Guidelines for youth strength training

The right strength training program for your child isn't just a scaled-down version of what an adult would do. Many adult programs focus on fewer repetitions and heavier weights. A youth strength training program needs to focus on:

Correct technique
Smooth, controlled motions
Less resistance and many repetitions
Your child's coach can tailor a strength training program for your child according to your child's age, size, skills and sports interests. The general principles of youth strength training are:

Provide instruction. Show your child how to perform strength training exercises using controlled breathing and proper form. You might ask a trained professional to demonstrate. If you enroll your child in a class, make sure there's at least one instructor for every 10 students to ensure that your child receives proper instruction.
Supervise. Adult supervision is important to reinforce safety and good technique. For instance, if your child lifts weights to strength train, a spotter — someone who stands ready to grab the weights — can step in if the weight becomes too heavy. As a parent, you can get involved in strength training, too. You can supervise your child and serve as a positive reinforcement for healthy lifestyle habits.
Warm up; cool down. Have your child begin each workout with 5 to 10 minutes of a warm-up activity, such as walking, jogging in place or jumping rope. This makes muscles warm and ready for action, all the while minimizing the risk of injury. End each workout with a cool down, including some light stretching.
Think light weights, controlled repetitions. One set of 12 to 20 repetitions at a lighter weight is all it takes. Kids don't need weights specially sized for them. They can safely lift adult-size weights as long as the weight isn't too heavy. The resistance doesn't have to come from weights, either. Resistance tubing can be just as effective — especially for younger kids.
Rest between workouts. Establish a rest period of at least a day between strength training workouts. Two or three sessions per week are plenty.
Track progress. Teach your child how to fill out a chart of which exercises, how many repetitions, and what weights or resistance he or she uses during a workout. It will be helpful in monitoring progress.
Add weight gradually. Only when your child masters proper form should you add weight. If your child can't do 10 repetitions at a certain weight, it's too heavy.
Keep it fun. Vary the routine often. Kids are more likely to stick with strength training if they don't get bored by it.
Results won't come overnight. But over time, you and your child will notice a difference in your child's muscle strength and endurance.


A healthy habit for a lifetime

If your child shows an interest in strength training, know that it can be a safe and effective activity. Along with aerobic exercise, stretching, and balance and stability, strength training is one part of a well-rounded fitness program.

Encourage physical activity in your child — it's a key step to becoming a healthy adult.
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post #13 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:20 PM
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Strength training for pre-teens is ok if done correctly. This is the stance of the American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Controlled movements, light weights, 12-20 reps, one set. That is all it takes for a pre-teen. Two days a week are plenty. If your kid can't do 10 reps the weight is too heavy.

My daughter who is 11 has been lifting weights since she was 9. She's 5' 3" tall and weight 102 pounds. She grew 2" this past year. I don't think her growth plates have shut down and she'll be a six footer when she is done. She does 15-20 reps, one set, one exercise per body part and tons of plyometrics. It really set her apart in softball.

My youngest, who is a soccer freak, is 6. She strength trains but its really about her body weight. We do lots of plyometrics, chinups, situps, pushups, etc.

Hella lot better than sitting in front of the Playstation 3 and playing video games all the time.

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post #14 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPS
Most trainers I've spoken to will tell you that weights are not for kids. Raven is right again on this one. No weights for young kids.

JPS
Raven is wrong.

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post #15 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:25 PM
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http://www.naturalstrength.com/resea...?ArticleID=200

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Research clearly indicates that boys and girls can safely improve their muscle strength and body composition through a basic and brief program of strength exercise. In one study (Westcott, 1993), 57 preadolescents performed 5 exercises, 1 set, 8 to 12 repetitions, 3 days a week, with slow movement speed and full movement range. After 8 weeks of training, the participants increased their muscle strength by 55 percent and improved their body composition by 2 percent (4 pounds more lean weight and 2.5 pounds less fat weight).

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post #16 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd
But, what is the age where it becomes ok?

You only have so much conrtrol over them in the later teens, but I'd suggest not being concerned with serious strength gains or hypertrophy until at least 17-18. Until then focus on flexibility and agility.

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post #17 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by 01WhiteCobra

I never said that it wouldn't be beneficial in the short term, my concern lies in affecting long term development.

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post #18 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Raven
I never said that it wouldn't be beneficial in the short term, my concern lies in affecting long term development.
I don't think the American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Sports Medicine or the National Strength and Conditioning Association have a problem with it either (short term or long term.)

http://aappolicy.aappublications.org...;107/6/1470#B4

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Strength training programs do not seem to adversely affect linear growth and do not seem to have any long-term detrimental effect on cardiovascular health.2,4,17-19 Young athletes with hypertension may experience further elevation of blood pressure from the isometric demands of strength training
2. Faigenbaum AD, Zaichkowsky LD, Westcott WL, Micheli LJ, Fehlandt AF The effects of a twice-a-week strength training program on children. Pediatr Exerc Sci 1993; 5:339-346

4. Ramsay JA, Blimkie CJ, Smith K, Garner S, MacDougall J, Sale DG Strength training effects in prepubescent boys. Issues and controversies. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1990; 22:605-614 [CrossRef][Medline]

17. Weltman A, Janney C, Rians CB, Strand K, Katch FT The effects of hydraulic-resistance strength training on serum lipid levels in prepubertal boys. Am J Dis Child 1987; 141:777-780 [CrossRef][Medline]

18. Weltman A, Janney C, Rians CB, The effects of hydraulic resistance strength training in pre-pubertal males. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1986; 18:629-638 [Medline]

19. Bailey DA, Martin AD Physical activity and skeletal health in adolescents. Pediatr Exerc Sci 1994; 6:330-347

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post #19 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:37 PM
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I would say as an athlete who made it to the next level, college football, it is best if you can get your kids to work out young. Not lifting alot of weight or anything tough, just your basic crunches, push ups, jump rope etc. I started doing all that when i was younger, but one thing i do wish i worked on was speed training. It's always good to be the fastest one on the team you play for. Running hills, Squat Jumps w/o weight or bar, just squat touch floor and jump; Alot of stretching is good too, make sure the kid stretches b4 any excersize.

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post #20 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhatdowninTx
Alot of stretching is good too, make sure the kid stretches b4 any excersize.
Warming up prior to strenous exercise good. Stretching before exercise bad.

Warmup before exercise... prevent injury
Stretch before exercise... no effect on injury

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post #21 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 03:22 PM
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There is conflicting information on the Internet...go figure. I found one that said, "Children who are less than 12 years old or are prepubescent (before puberty) are considered preadolescent, and teenagers who are roughly 12 to 19 years old are considered adolescents. Although strength gains in preadolescent children have been noted, much of the improvement comes from neurogenic adaptation (recruitment or adaptation of muscle fibers) rather than from an increase in lean muscle mass. Preadolescent children lack androgens, which are natural steroid hormones, such as testosterone or androsterone, that control the development and maintenance of masculine characteristics. The onset of secondary sexual characteristics (pubic and facial hair, enlarged genitalia, etc.) generally predicts the presence of these hormones. The point at which puberty begins varies between the sexes and among individuals. For the most part, children will benefit from a resistance training program after they have reached 13 or 14 years of age when their nervous system and muscle development are sufficient. "

Which is what I had meant to say, not before 12..... It's what my son's trainer had told me. Don't start weights until they are at least 12....or show signs of hormonal changes....

I'm not arguing just making a statement.

When to Begin

Also found this article saying that weight training does not stunt the child's growth.... Teen Body Building
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post #22 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 03:28 PM
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we were going to weightlifting competitions in 7th grade. (12 yo). I was doing military in the 140 max range. I knew guys that were benching 250-260 max at that age. Seemed pretty common practice to everyone I knew.
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post #23 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by 1985GT
we were going to weightlifting competitions in 7th grade. (12 yo). I was doing military in the 140 max range. I knew guys that were benching 250-260 max at that age. Seemed pretty common practice to everyone I knew.
Ummm...
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we were going to weightlifting competitions in 7th grade. (12 yo). I was doing military in the 140 max range. I knew guys that were benching 250-260 max at that age. Seemed pretty common practice to everyone I knew.

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post #25 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-26-2007, 04:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPS
There is conflicting information on the Internet...go figure. I found one that said, "Children who are less than 12 years old or are prepubescent (before puberty) are considered preadolescent, and teenagers who are roughly 12 to 19 years old are considered adolescents. Although strength gains in preadolescent children have been noted, much of the improvement comes from neurogenic adaptation (recruitment or adaptation of muscle fibers) rather than from an increase in lean muscle mass. Preadolescent children lack androgens, which are natural steroid hormones, such as testosterone or androsterone, that control the development and maintenance of masculine characteristics. The onset of secondary sexual characteristics (pubic and facial hair, enlarged genitalia, etc.) generally predicts the presence of these hormones. The point at which puberty begins varies between the sexes and among individuals. For the most part, children will benefit from a resistance training program after they have reached 13 or 14 years of age when their nervous system and muscle development are sufficient. "

Which is what I had meant to say, not before 12..... It's what my son's trainer had told me. Don't start weights until they are at least 12....or show signs of hormonal changes....

I'm not arguing just making a statement.

When to Begin

Also found this article saying that weight training does not stunt the child's growth.... Teen Body Building
I'm sure your trainer does you well.

I'll go ahead and side with the American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

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post #26 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-28-2007, 07:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 01WhiteCobra
I'm sure your trainer does you well.

I'll go ahead and side with the American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association.


You know I read alot of the stuff that is posted in here, and I have to say that your opinion is one that I hold in high regard.

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post #27 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-28-2007, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny
Isometrics, sit-ups, push-ups, running, swimming is basically what my 11 year old does. He's got on the Bowflex to go through the motion, but no serious resistance. I told him he won't be doing anything with weights until 16 at the earliest.
Your kid will be picked last...haha


I started around 11years old, and never had injuries until I started powerlifting...which I think should be removed from Highschool sports. Just dont let the kid to heavy weight and he'll be a badass in sports. let him have the leg up...
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post #28 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-28-2007, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by 01WhiteCobra
Warming up prior to strenous exercise good. Stretching before exercise bad.

Warmup before exercise... prevent injury
Stretch before exercise... no effect on injury
Are you suggesting that stretching after warmup (5-10 minute light cardio for example) has no relation to muscular injury from exercise i.e. free weights? I notice that stretching is usually a necesity for me after warmup, my muscles are looser and feel like they can take more. If I don't it seems like I'm more prone to pulling a muscle, legs would be the best example of this in my case.

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post #29 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-28-2007, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fobra
Are you suggesting that stretching after warmup (5-10 minute light cardio for example) has no relation to muscular injury from exercise i.e. free weights? I notice that stretching is usually a necesity for me after warmup, my muscles are looser and feel like they can take more. If I don't it seems like I'm more prone to pulling a muscle, legs would be the best example of this in my case.
The research done by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and published in March 2004 Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise concluded there was no evidence that stretching before or after prevented soreness or reduced the chance of injury.

Being flexible is good but doesn't prevent injury. In the study by CDC they reviewed over 100 research papers on stretching. The conclusion was injury rates were higher when the subject was considered "most flexible" and when the subject was considered "least flexible." Those with average flexibility fared the best.

The other paper I've read (a link to its abstract below) lists the following of why stretching before exercise that doesn't require excessive muscle length is no good:

1. In animals, immobilization or heating-induced increases in muscle compliance cause tissues to rupture more easily.
2. Stretching before exercise should have no effect for activities in which excessive muscle length is not an issue (e.g., jogging)
3. Stretching won't affect muscle compliance during eccentric activity, when most strains are believed to occur.
4. Stretching can produce damage at the cytoskeleton level.
5. Stretching appears to mask muscle pain in humans.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/en...&dopt=Abstract

The CDC research paper concluded that it wasn't apparent if stretching before or after exercise did any good. Basically, if you feel good doing it, then do it.

I'm more on the "before exercise, warm up good, stretching wastes time."

Having wrote all that I believe flexibility is important regardless of your athletic endeavors. I do a 30 minute routine 3-4 times a week when I watch the boob-tube.

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post #30 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 12:36 AM
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I started when I was 14, and I was a little behind my athletic peers. (I was a late bloomer too.) I think it really depends on the child. Just be careful not to overdo it, since they won't know when enough is enough.

One thing to watch out for is Osgood-Schlatter's disease. (Too early to worry about it now, but it's something to bear in mind.) It's when an adolescent hits a growth spurt, and the leg bones grow but the leg muscles/tendons have a hard time stretching and growing due to constanly being tight from excercise and really puts stress on the patellar tendon. It causes inflammation of the knee and serious pain. In my case, it had partially detached and pulled up a bone spur with it.

It's just an annoyance really, it made it very hard to run and hurt just to walk. It goes away once you stop growing. My doctor told me back then (1986 or so) it could be exacerbated by weight training, but in a cursory search on the web, I couldn't find any modern evidence to corroborate that.
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post #31 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 12:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Denny
Ummm...
and when I say "we" I mean my fellow football teamates. 7th grade weightlifting competitions were school sponsored events in the late 80's in Plano. Its what we did in the offseason. I probably still have the ribbons to prove it.
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post #32 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 02:47 AM
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i would say 14-15 would be a good age to have someone start a full blown workout routine. Anything younger then that should be pretty highly supervised.

at 9 though your body isn't going to build like it would a few years down the road. plus if he gets injured the it could be ten times worst than the gains could be from working out. at the age of 9 if he were to injure something his body is going to try and compensate and thats not good.
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post #33 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 06:33 AM
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Your kid will be picked last...haha


I started around 11years old, and never had injuries until I started powerlifting...which I think should be removed from Highschool sports. Just dont let the kid to heavy weight and he'll be a badass in sports. let him have the leg up...
Last for what? He's already faster than most his age. He can throw a baseball faster and harder than probably 1/2 the ADULTS on this board, more than likely hit better too. Sorry, not all people want to be powerlifting dumbasses.
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post #34 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 08:08 AM
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Last for what? He's already faster than most his age. He can throw a baseball faster and harder than probably 1/2 the ADULTS on this board, more than likely hit better too. Sorry, not all people want to be powerlifting dumbasses.
Weight lifting isn't the end-all to athletics like you are finding out. Especially in the "skill" positions. Skill and technique is much more important.

I know a kid that even the black kids call "White Lightning." He reminds me of Jeremy Wariner from Baylor (400m stud).

His love is baseball although he plays football and runs track as well. His time is better well spent out of the weight room than in the weight room. He has enough strength to excel.

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post #35 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 11:26 AM
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The research done by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and published in March 2004 Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise concluded there was no evidence that stretching before or after prevented soreness or reduced the chance of injury.

Being flexible is good but doesn't prevent injury. In the study by CDC they reviewed over 100 research papers on stretching. The conclusion was injury rates were higher when the subject was considered "most flexible" and when the subject was considered "least flexible." Those with average flexibility fared the best.

The other paper I've read (a link to its abstract below) lists the following of why stretching before exercise that doesn't require excessive muscle length is no good:

1. In animals, immobilization or heating-induced increases in muscle compliance cause tissues to rupture more easily.
2. Stretching before exercise should have no effect for activities in which excessive muscle length is not an issue (e.g., jogging)
3. Stretching won't affect muscle compliance during eccentric activity, when most strains are believed to occur.
4. Stretching can produce damage at the cytoskeleton level.
5. Stretching appears to mask muscle pain in humans.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/en...&dopt=Abstract

The CDC research paper concluded that it wasn't apparent if stretching before or after exercise did any good. Basically, if you feel good doing it, then do it.

I'm more on the "before exercise, warm up good, stretching wastes time."

Having wrote all that I believe flexibility is important regardless of your athletic endeavors. I do a 30 minute routine 3-4 times a week when I watch the boob-tube.
Interesting, the thing I can say and I will stand by is when I run, particularly sprints and I don't stretch out after a quick warm-up, I find myself pulling muscles or coming very close to pulling them, such as my hamstrings. Maybe I'm an exception to the rule.

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post #36 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Fobra
Interesting, the thing I can say and I will stand by is when I run, particularly sprints and I don't stretch out after a quick warm-up, I find myself pulling muscles or coming very close to pulling them, such as my hamstrings. Maybe I'm an exception to the rule.
You're not the only one, if I don't stretch before Any running I definitely either pull something or come close to pulling it.
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post #37 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 12:01 PM
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Interesting, the thing I can say and I will stand by is when I run, particularly sprints and I don't stretch out after a quick warm-up, I find myself pulling muscles or coming very close to pulling them, such as my hamstrings. Maybe I'm an exception to the rule.
Is that the only time you do flexibility training, prior to exercise?

I have seperate times when I do flexibility training and average about 90 minutes a week (3x30 minutes)

There are times when I'll run easy for 5 minutes and stretch prior to the "real run" but that is really an exception. Typically I'll feel some tightness coming on after lots of training (like a 60-70 mile run week the week prior) and I'm sore and tight.

But for the most part I ease into a run, bike, swim session with 10 minutes of easy work to start the workout and thats about it. 5-10 minutes spinning on a bike prior to weight training.

I'd say if the only time you stretch is prior to exercise than that is better than no flexibility training. Warm up->Stretch->Exercise, in that case, would be better than Warm up->Exercise.

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post #38 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-29-2007, 04:38 PM
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Is that the only time you do flexibility training, prior to exercise?
No, in fact, I usually stretch after a 5-10 minute warmup prior to any workout; weights or jogging/run. Even if I decide to jog for 30-40 minutes, I still stretch out after 5 minutes of the jog, after that, my muscles are more loose and feel like they can take more abuse. It just doesn't feel right if I don't stretch out after a warmup. Besides, given the enlarged plica problem I have which is near the IBT, if I don't stretch that area prior to the main run/job/sprint, it wants to sieze up a little or just causes a sense of letting you know that something isn't right. Now that kind of sense isn't excruciating pain, but it's annoying nonetheless. Having mentioned the plica, I will likely be having it removed in the next month or two so it doesn't bother me by snapping back and forth and inflame even worse in the future. I have been recommended to take cortisone injections or other anti-inflammatory medications, but I don't feel like taking that stuff for awhile. Besides, animal studies have shown that cortisone injections weakens the tendons and cartilage over time and I don't want a short term relief to cause long term problems.

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post #39 of 39 (permalink) Old 07-02-2007, 10:23 AM
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something i ran across. There is a part 2 if anyone is interested...


Weight Training For Preadolescent Children

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Weight Training For Preadolescent Children
By Zachary Long

For years, strength training and weightlifting have been used by adolescents and adults to improve their sports performance and general well-being. But because of the former beliefs of pediatricians and scientists, weight training has been frowned upon for use by preadolescent children. Despite people?s perceptions that weight training is not suitable for young children, a properly designed weight training program is not only safe, but is also beneficial in the improvement of prepubescent children?s athletic performance and overall health.

Myths

There are many former myths which make weightlifting for children taboo in most people?s minds. For years, it was considered dangerous and risky for children to participate in strength training programs. It was thought that lifting weights would close children?s growth plates, which control the length and shape of their bones (3). Closing the growth plates would cause a child?s growth to be stunted, and therefore, lead to limbs being shorter than their possible length. It was also thought that lifting weights would reduce flexibility and cause participants muscles to tighten up. Another misconception was that speed would be decreased as an athlete?s strength increased. Coordination was also believed to be hindered as a result of strength training (10).

Safety

The safety of strength training for children has been examined in many recent studies. One of these studies, done by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, reported that over 8,000 injuries have occurred in children under the age of 14 while lifting weights in the past year. However, this study did not investigate the conditions of the lifting environment or the history of the children studied. The study did document that most of these injuries occurred while the subjects were in an unsupervised environment (15). Weightlifting injuries usually range from strains and sprains to the occasional fracture. Overuse injuries also occur, but can be easily prevented by using a properly designed strength training program. Several studies have looked at the risk of injury to children while participating in strength training programs under the proper supervision and found it to be very low, some saying they have never had any injuries (2,6). The difference in the safety of playing sports and lifting weights has also been examined. One study looked at over 1500 sports related injuries in children, and found that less that 1% of these injuries occurred as a result of weightlifting (13). The stress on children?s joints while playing sports has actually been proven to be greater than the stress put on by lifting weights (15). Due to this, most reports seem to agree that it is much safer for young children to participate in a properly designed strength training programs than it is for them to play sports.

Growth Plate Closure?

The biggest concern parents and coaches have about letting their children lift weights is the myth that it will lead to bone damage and stunted growth. The epiphyseal plate, better known as the growth plate, is growing tissue at the end of children?s bones. Many fear that weightlifting will lead to the premature closing of these plates and stunted growth. (3). Recent studies have found that proper strength training will not damage a child?s growth plates, stunt their growth, or affect their maximum potential size (2). The premature closing of the growth plates has actually been related to hormonal influences, rather than injury (8). The American College of Sports Medicine has said, ?There is no current scientific evidence to support that early weight training will stunt a child?s growth? (3). A few studies conducted by Dr. Avery Faigenbaum have shown that it is possible to experience positive growth effects from strength training when children receive proper nutrition and physical activity (2). Other studies have found that weightlifting will increase the amount of muscle gained during puberty than normally expected (14).


Part 2 will be in new thread

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