Lesson learned about the wrong shoes - DFWstangs Forums
 
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-04-2007, 11:12 PM Thread Starter
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Lesson learned about the wrong shoes

Back in late September, I bought the New Balance "B-Zip" shoes since they are a very light cross training shoe for weights and running (so I thought). I didn't have any problems until I started picking up my running over the Christmas break since I didn't run that much prior due to hockey and other things. After a couple weeks running about 3 times per week 4-5 miles over the break, I decided to take it to 6 miles and by this time, it was early January. Well, a little past 2 miles I felt something on the right side of my knee start to bother me but I decided to move on. However, at 3 miles, the pain intensified so bad that I had to stop. After about 10 minutes of cooling down when I got home, my knee completely seized up and I had to limp around for the next couple of days unless I got the blood flowing in that area. Walking didn't start feeling normal until about 2-3 weeks later and to make things worse, the second part of the hockey season started and this hindered my ability to do cross overs. I went to the sports doctor at UNT last week and he said that it's probably this fiber type band that goes from the side of your hip all the way down to your foot. I can even feel this chunk move back and forth when I bend my knee. Since the day of my knee messing up, I have bought these Saucony shoes that help correct my overpronation and they feel great, but the problem is I can only run about 1 mile before the knee starts acting up again (I wasn't even able to do that a couple weeks ago, 4-5 mins was pushing it!). So, to all you runners out there that don't take the time getting a good shoe made for you, I would highly recommend you change your habit, yes it might be more expensive, but prolonging the life of your joints/tendens is way more important.

I just did a search, this could be my problem:
Iliotibial Band Syndrome

What Causes Iliotibial Band Syndrome?

This is an overuse inflammatory condition due to friction (rubbing) of a band of a tendon over the outer bone (lateral condyle) of the knee. Although iliotibial band syndrome may be caused by direct injury to the knee, it is most often caused by the stress of long-term overuse, such as sometimes occurs in sports training.

What Are the Symptoms of Iliotibial Band Syndrome and How Is It Diagnosed?

A person with this syndrome feels an ache or burning sensation at the side of the knee during activity. Pain may be localized at the side of the knee or radiate up the side of the thigh. A person may also feel a snap (that's probably the chunk I described above) when the knee is bent and then straightened. Swelling is usually absent and knee motion is normal. The diagnosis of this disorder is usually based on the patient's symptoms, such as pain at the lateral condyle, and exclusion of other conditions with similar symptoms.

How Is Iliotibial Band Syndrome Treated?

Usually, iliotibial band syndrome disappears if the person reduces activity and performs stretching exercises followed by muscle-strengthening exercises. In rare cases when the syndrome doesn't disappear, surgery may be necessary to split the tendon so it is not stretched too tightly over the bone.
http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/h...ee/tendons.htm

The doctor prescribed me this prednisone stuff to reduce my bodies inflammation response, seems have helped out some. I was told this injury will probably take a few months to recover fully recover

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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-05-2007, 09:11 AM
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Yep... properly fitted running shoes make a world of difference.

I overpronate as well. The best motion control shoe I've found is the Brooks Beast (I'm using the Brook Beast 9 at the moment).

In the past I've also used the Asics GEL-Evolution II and New Balance 1010.

Also, I swap out running shoes about every 3-4 months depending on how many miles I've done. Typically, every 400-500 miles.

My 401K is now a 400K (was 301K)
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-05-2007, 09:24 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 01WhiteCobra
Yep... properly fitted running shoes make a world of difference.

I overpronate as well. The best motion control shoe I've found is the Brooks Beast (I'm using the Brook Beast 9 at the moment).

In the past I've also used the Asics GEL-Evolution II and New Balance 1010.

Also, I swap out running shoes about every 3-4 months depending on how many miles I've done. Typically, every 400-500 miles.
I'm using the Saucony "Hurricane" now, they secure the foot very nice. Have you ever had any knee injurys due to the wrong shoe before?

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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-05-2007, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fobra
I'm using the Saucony "Hurricane" now, they secure the foot very nice. Have you ever had any knee injurys due to the wrong shoe before?
Oh yea. Nothing serious enough to require surgery though. I did suffer tight ITB which I stretched out over time. Some mild runners knee (pain in the knee cap region, directly in front of the knee). Of course the achilles tendon rupture last October which I attribute to years of running without motion control shoes.

Motion control shoes keep your foot stable which prevents your knee from torquing inward each time you step.

I think running in the wrong shoes combined with running on roads (roads are cambered and if you run against traffic your right leg will always be higher than the left on the road) brought a wealth of problems to the right leg.

I use to run in Saucony Shadows all the time in my 20s which is a nuetral shoe. Over the years my knees just hurt and I thought it was just part of running long miles (I was doing 60 miles a week, sometimes with an AM and PM run).

That is when I really started to research training and diet and such. It didn't take me very long to determine I was running in the wrong shoes. It took a few months but I went pain free and have been every since (20 years total worth of distance running/triathlons/duathlons/etc.)

I also started doing alot more trail running as of late and getting off the roads.

My 401K is now a 400K (was 301K)
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-05-2007, 10:26 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 01WhiteCobra
Oh yea. Nothing serious enough to require surgery though. I did suffer tight ITB which I stretched out over time. Some mild runners knee (pain in the knee cap region, directly in front of the knee). Of course the achilles tendon rupture last October which I attribute to years of running without motion control shoes.

Motion control shoes keep your foot stable which prevents your knee from torquing inward each time you step.

I think running in the wrong shoes combined with running on roads (roads are cambered and if you run against traffic your right leg will always be higher than the left on the road) brought a wealth of problems to the right leg.

I use to run in Saucony Shadows all the time in my 20s which is a nuetral shoe. Over the years my knees just hurt and I thought it was just part of running long miles (I was doing 60 miles a week, sometimes with an AM and PM run).

That is when I really started to research training and diet and such. It didn't take me very long to determine I was running in the wrong shoes. It took a few months but I went pain free and have been every since (20 years total worth of distance running/triathlons/duathlons/etc.)

I also started doing alot more trail running as of late and getting off the roads.
I'll have to do some research on the motion control stuff, I don't know much about it. How did you stretch the ITB? That's not an easy area to reach since there aren't that many stretch receptors. Did you do any of the exercises on this page to rehabilitate it? How long did it take for your ITB to be back to par?
http://www.lwcoaching.com/library/runnersguideitbs.htm

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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-06-2007, 09:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fobra
I'll have to do some research on the motion control stuff, I don't know much about it. How did you stretch the ITB? That's not an easy area to reach since there aren't that many stretch receptors. Did you do any of the exercises on this page to rehabilitate it? How long did it take for your ITB to be back to par?
http://www.lwcoaching.com/library/runnersguideitbs.htm
About the only one I do on that site is the foam roller.

It takes about 3-6 weeks for it to feel comfortable again. But, I never stopped running either. But I'm sure it depends on the severity of the injury.

I do three stretches that are "self-stretches":

1. Cross your feet. Lean in the direction of the foot that is crossed in front while keeping the leg in back as straight as possible. You should feel it over the hip of the leg behind.

2. Lie on your back with your hands out to the side. Cross the affected leg over your body (at the hip, should make a 90 degree or close angle at the hip as it is crossing). Work to straighten out the affected leg knee as much as possible. Use your hand on the knee to help the stretch and bring the knee down towards the ground.

3. Sit on your butt feet out. Take the affected leg, bend at the knee and move it across the other leg. Use your hand to pull the affected leg at the knee across.

If you have someone to help (I had a physical therapist with the injury, now my 11 year old daughter):

1. Lie on your unaffected side. You legs bent at a 90 degree angle. Have your assistant pull your affected leg backwards with one hand placed at your affected hip (for support) and the other at the ankle (or knee) to pull your affected leg backwards.

My 401K is now a 400K (was 301K)
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-06-2007, 11:37 AM
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Man that sucks about your knees, hope everything works out. NIKE has been very good to me.
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